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#TBT :: Board Member and Intelligence Professional Charles Randolph on Things You Need to Tell Your Boss

Posted By Administration, Thursday, August 4, 2016

Charles Randolph, Senior Director of Executive Protection, Event Security and Intelligence at Microsoft, and AIRIP Board Member shared the following on his personal blog in September 2015, but it remains relevant, so we're sharing today for a little #TBT.

A huge thank you to Charles for his insights and for his leadership on our board, and to Microsoft for their partnership and membership in AIRIP!
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Intelligence Analyst – Five things your boss is thinking but may not tell you: TWO is surprising and FIVE is vital

1 – I’m also a critical thinker, I just may not use the same vocabulary as you: Hey, I may not use the same language, but I’m also analytical (I may just not realize it). By doing operational analysis, I’m developing courses of action (COAs) and making mission assumptions based on the facts in front of me. When on an operation or in an emergency, I’ll be using what I have gathered and developing COAs based on pre-thought scenarios and trends that are manifesting. Just like you, I’m a critical thinker; please, remind me of that from time-to-time.

2 – I need you to help me, help you, to help me: Your request for information (RFI) process may not be the same one that I am familiar with. I also may not fully understand how to ask for what I need or am unsure of what you can do. Therefore, I need you to take the lead in this dance. Show me what you’ve got and suggest we walk through the operations plan (OPLAN) together. When we do that, listen and ask questions. As an operator, I may not care about the form you need filled out, I do need your insight and keen eye towards pattern analysis to see something I don’t. Honestly, I need you to be my partner and educate to develop me.

3 – Sometimes, I need you to slow down: You can get excited, I get it (and I like that about you). But, if I’m excited and you're excited and we are all excited….well, I need you to be the one to slow down and make sure we are paying attention to detail and managing the little things which always come up in the form of Mr. Murphy – and his damnable law. Offer up some advice, ensure you stuff is double-checked before you hit send and be that calming voice. I’ve got a lot going on and sometimes I may just need to see someone being outwardly steadfast.

4 – You don’t have a crystal ball, I know that… let me know what you think anyway: I get it, you’re not 100%. Guess what, neither am I. I don’t need you to be all knowing (although, secretly I wish you were). I just need you to give me the best understanding you have and say the same. If it doesn’t go down the way you describe, I may get cranky…but I don’t blame you (I’m probably blaming myself). No one expects the black swan’s arrival, but I need you to tell me when you think conditions may be right for impending issues.

Finally, and most important…

5 – I trust you: From the mundane to the insane, you’re my go-to! I may always not say it, but you are.  I have a healthy trust in your abilities. This is why I ask you to brief first, set the tone and put a ‘realistic’ filter on what’s happening. The interwebs opened up a whole new meaning to the concept of ‘breaking news' and I can’t always be sure it affects our situation. I know you have my back, you understand my needs, and will tell me what’s important in the din.  Because you’re intelligent, professional, curious and thoughtful… I trust you.

this is dedicated to all my favorite analysts…

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Tags:  AIRIP  AIRIP Board  AIRIPMentoring  code of conduct  Information Sharing  Intelligence Outreach  IntelligenceCareers  Networking  Professional Development  Professional Standard  Risk Intelligence  Risk Intelligence Organization 

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AIRIP Launches Code of Conduct

Posted By Rachel Bode | AIRIP CEO, Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Risk Intelligence Trade Association

Ethics in intelligence is not usually a thought that gets a lot of serious attention, and intelligence tends to have a bad reputation on this topic. Events even in the news during the past few weeks show that governments and other organizations will go to extreme measures to gather intelligence if the conditions allow, and if the value of the intelligence is perceived great enough.

That said, often organizations, including governments, can gather extremely valuable information via ethical, responsible and open means. Growth in the Open Source intelligence collection capabilities and staff within the United States Intelligence Community, and numerous intelligence successes attributed to open source collection, show that the covert and clandestine methods of spy lore are no longer the only way to gather valuable info.

In addition, the scrutiny that the public places on organizations – governments, non-profits, and for-profit entities alike – can be a deterrent to some types of collection that may have been considered status quo in the past. Companies that employ intelligence analysts (and our ranks are growing) should be concerned with the sources and methods used by their analysts. A bad choice by an analyst or intelligence manager can have serious negative consequences on an organization’s reputation, stock price, and safety of personnel.

AIRIP was founded on the principle that there can be ethics in intelligence collection, and that there should be a standard for organizations to use as they develop and mature intelligence programs.

Without a professional standard, analysts could be asked to do unethical things in the name of collection, and the actions of intelligence professionals could seriously harm the reputation of the organizations where they work. Analysts need a professional standard to point to when unscrupulous colleagues ask for information to be collected in ways that could harmful to themselves, their colleagues or their organization. Analysts also need a guide on how to protect themselves when collecting information in the open source world.

For these reasons, AIRIP is proud to introduce the Risk Intelligence Code of Conduct. This was presented to members on October 28, 2015 via webinar with two experts in the field speaking in support of the code of conduct. The webinar was attended by over half of AIRIP’s current membership, and polls at the beginning and end of the webinar showed overwhelming support for the Code of Conduct as written.

We hope that members and non-members will use this Code of Conduct to discuss and enact ethical intelligence collection within their organizations, and form a basis for their own Codes of Conduct.

Tags:  code of conduct  ethics  Risk Intelligence 

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